Not All Monsters… UPDATE

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As you may have heard, Strangehouse Books is working on quite the anthology for 2020.

Right now, we are looking at an October 2020 release for Not All Monsters. We wanted to make sure we set out the date far ahead, so as to give us enough time to really prepare, thoroughly edit, and give ourselves a wide window with which to execute the production. The book will probably end up at 90-100K words. We wanted to be sure to have lots of space for lots of voices. And let me tell you, it is a good thing we’ve approached this anthology the way we have.

Submissions have been open less than two weeks and we’ve gotten so, so many stories. The response to our call has been overwhelming, to say the least, and we couldn’t be happier about it. Reading through will take considerable time, but authors should expect to hear from us starting in February.

Submissions will remain open until we’re completely satisfied with our selections and the 90-100K word count has been met.

We look forward to reading your work!

TTFN

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October update for Rooster Republic and Strangehouse Books, now with pumpkin spice!

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[For the really big announcement, scroll to the bottom. Otherwise, read on – Ed.]

We are closing in on the end of our production schedule for 2018. The last several weeks have seen some great new books go live: Andrew James Stone’s All Hail the House Gods; Christoph Paul’s At Least I Get You < In My Art; Matthew Sunrich’s Someone Shot the Hip Young Conductor; Charles Austin Muir’s Body Building Spider Rangers.

For October, we are currently prepping both Michael Allen Rose’s Rock and Roll Death Patrol and Sara Tantlinger’s The Devil’s Dreamland, respectively.

Beyond that, we have Gareth Bennett’s The Full Howie, and then…

…well, that’s it, for a good, long while. Let’s talk about that.

Continue reading “October update for Rooster Republic and Strangehouse Books, now with pumpkin spice!”

Rooster Republic’s Future (not scary)

Well, it looks like we have some books coming your way. Let’s talk about ‘em!

The next release coming down the pipe is Christoph Paul’s eagerly-awaited poetry collection, At Least I Get You < In My Art. That’ll drop right at the end of July. It’s the first of two poetry releases we have planned for 2018.

Next, we have Matthew Stephen Sunrich’s short collection, Someone Shot The Hip, Young Conductor. This one is a turn towards the humorous and the absurd. It should go live in August.

September has two releases planned: Charles Austin Muir’s Bodybuilding Spider Rangers and Other Stories; Sara Tantlinger’s The Devil’s Dreamland, poetry inspired by H.H. Holmes.

And that leaves us with October. Michael Allen Rose’s Rock & Roll Death Patrol should go live in our spookiest month. The novel is a tongue-in-cheek, comic-book-style adventure that reimagines groups like the Justice League and/or Avengers as literal rock ‘n’ roll stars; takes the idea of the rock “supergroup” to another level.

And then there is The Full Howie.

Continue reading “Rooster Republic’s Future (not scary)”

G. Arthur Brown Joins Rooster as Head Editor

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Art by Jarvis Chickpea

The proceeding is an interview with the supposed G. Arthur Brown. 


First, feel free to give a little background on yourself and your own written work.

I started writing absurd proto-Bizarro fiction long ago (c. 1996), before it had a name or I knew there was a market for it. This was also before I knew there were quasi-popular writers like Mark Leyner or Donald Barthelme or Thomas Pynchon who just didn’t give a rat’s ass about the conventions of popular fiction, and before I’d read any Kafka. So I gave up on writing for a long time, not picking it up again until about 2007, with the added advantage of having now read Borges, Burroughs, and Ionesco, as well as having seen many bizarre and highly inspirational films, such as Cemetery Man, Mulholland Drive, Schizopolis, Naked Lunch, and Dead Alive. Then, I stumbled upon the Bizarro community and the rest is history.

Continue reading “G. Arthur Brown Joins Rooster as Head Editor”